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FROM SITE SELECTION MAGAZINE, JULY 2022 ISSUE
From the May Issue

NEW JERSEY

Wind Demonstrates How Growth and Sustainability Can Coincide in New Jersey

Learn more from our conversation with EEW American Offshore Structure CEO Lee Laurendeau.

Read More >>>

 

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 CONWAY DATA SNAPSHOT 
Earlier this month IKEA U.S. and Electrify America announced a collaboration that will install more than 200 ultra-fast public and fleet charging stations at IKEA retail locations in 18 states.
Photo courtesy of IKEA and Electrify America

Forbes Advisor has examined U.S. Department of Energy data to arrive at a ranking of most accessible states by ratio of registered electric vehicles to public charging stations. North Dakota is No. 1 with 3.18 EVs per charging station, because there were only 69 total charging stations (now up to 74 stations since Forbes Advisor’s analysis) and 220 registered electric vehicles in the state. The similarly spacious state of Wyoming is No. 2, followed by its polar opposite: Rhode Island, with a ratio of 6.24 EVs per charging station.


Graph courtesy of U.S. DOE

The DOE says there are 57,280 charging stations in the country as of this week. The graph above shows how fast they’ve grown in number since 2011. In 2021 alone, their number rose by more than 55%. Below are the top 10 states by total charging locations and number of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) charging ports. -Adam Bruns

State No. of Stations | EVSE Ports
California 14,583 | 37,611
New York 3,121 | 8,348
Florida 2,682 | 6,708
Texas 2,380 | 5,753
Massachusetts 2,293 | 5,084
Washington 1,666 | 4,096
Colorado 1,657 | 3,866
Georgia 1,545 | 3,941
Maryland 1,261 | 3,448
Pennsylvania 1,223 | 2,952

Source: U.S. DOE Alternative Fuels Data Center, August 25, 2022

 

2022 MISSISSIPPI DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

EAST MISSISSIPPI

Entrepreneurs Flourish in East Mississippi

So do manufacturers. Veteran economic developer David Rumbarger sheds light on the scene in Tupelo and the region.

Read More >>>

 

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 SITE SELECTION RECOMMENDS 

Centene will still complete construction of the Charlotte campus (rendering above) and then sell or lease it.

Archive rendering courtesy of EDPNC

Last week news broke that St. Louis-based Centene has pulled out of the major hub it planned to establish in Charlotte, citing the impact of remote work on its day-to-day operations. Michael Niedorff, the late CEO of Centene, had cited crime and public safety challenges in St. Louis vs. Charlotte when the investment was announced in 2020, though some news analysis showed the difference to be minimal.

According to reporting in the Charlotte Observer, the company plans to finish its massive building in University Research Park and sell or lease it, much as REI did when it decided at the pandemic’s outset to sell its brand new HQ campus to Microsoft. And it still plans to increase Charlotte employees from 700 to 900. North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper told the Charlotte Business Journal this week that he tried to talk Centene executives out of it, citing all that’s still unknown about how office use will shake out. “They told us that they would be reducing their real estate footprint about 70% across the country,” he told the CBJ. “When you do that, it’s obvious that you don’t need a new $550 million campus that you’ve just built in Charlotte.”

Meanwhile, reported the St. Louis Post-Dispatch in June, the company also is killing plans for a 1,000-seat civic auditorium in its St. Louis-area home of Clayton, forfeiting a $75 million local property tax break over 20 years. The auditorium was part of a $770 million campus expansion announced in 2016 that has proceeded in fits and starts. But one thing proceeding ahead of pace is Centene’s employment, which “grew from 1,288 workers in 2016 to 2,879 last year — well more than the 1,000 Centene told Clayton the expansion would bring,” the Post-Dispatch reported.

 

 PROJECT WATCH 

Indiana

Andretti Global, the parent company of Andretti Autosport, this week announced it has chosen Fishers, Indiana, to be the future home of its universal motorsports headquarters. The team intends to build a $200 million, 575,000-sq.-ft. facility that will occupy approximately 90 acres alongside the Nickel Plate Trail, the Ritchey Woods Nature Preserve and near the Indianapolis Metropolitan Airport. The new global headquarters would add up to 500 jobs to the local community by early 2026, including advanced R&D by Andretti Technologies. “Indiana holds an important place in the history of racing, and in my career as a driver and an owner,” said Andretti Global Chairman and CEO Michael Andretti. I’m happy to confirm that the Racing Capital of the World will continue to be the home of our global racing efforts for a long time to come … For us, it’s about more than just having somewhere to work on the cars; it’s about having a global motorsport home and sharing that with our people, our fans and our sponsors to advance the sport and leave a lasting legacy.” Pending approvals, construction will begin this fall with operations projected to begin in 2025. “Pending approval of the Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IEDC) board of directors,” the company stated, “the IEDC will commit an investment in Andretti Autosport of up to $19 million in the form of conditional tax credits and up to $125,000 in training grants based on the company’s plans to invest in its Indiana operations. The city of Fishers has approved additional incentives.”

Source: Conway Projects Report

New York

In July, the New York Power Authority board approved 94 MW of low-cost St. Lawrence hydropower to Air Products for this project in Massena, a village located in far upstate New York along the St. Lawrence Seaway, not far from Montréal, that is known as home to the world’s oldest operating aluminum smelter, operated by Alcoa, which began production 120 years ago. “Allocations from the St. Lawrence Power Project attract large-scale community investment and deliver good-paying jobs to the North Country,” said New York Power Authority Vice Chairman and Massena resident Eugene L. Nicandri. “In supporting Air Products' expansion, NYPA is furthering New York's aggressive climate goals and helping to advance the state's vision of becoming a regional hydrogen hub.” A news release explained that Preservation Power is composed of 490 megawatts of hydropower generated at the St. Lawrence Franklin D. Roosevelt Power Project that may be allocated to eligible businesses located in the Franklin, Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties of New York State. In addition, the NYPA board approved 16 MW of High Load Factor power that NYPA will procure for Air Products on the energy market. “Air Products' application has been considered under the Power Authority's green jobs evaluation criteria,” said the release, “which was approved by the trustees in December 2020, to allow NYPA to consider green job impacts in New York State when evaluating economic development power applications.”

Source: Conway Projects Report

 

 

 PHOTO OF THE DAY 
Photo courtesy of Adolfson & Peterson Construction

Earlier this week the new $33.5 million PGA of America headquarters opened on 6.2 acres of the new 660-acre PGA Frisco campus in Frisco, Texas, which includes two new 18-hole championship courses, a 510-room Omni Resort and a 30-acre practice facility and more. Located just a few miles away from Dallas Cowboys world headquarters, the campus is expected to drive more than $2 billion in economic impact to the stakeholders and community over the next 20 years. Three years ago Site Selection’s Ron Starner documented how Frisco beat out more than 200 other cities to land the project. The PGA of America — a 106-year-old organization comprising nearly 29,000 PGA teaching professionals that is separate and distinct from the PGA Tour — currently shows 22 job openings at its new campus.

 
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